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DIY Knock Off Plow & Hearth Stool

November 24, 2015 by Scott - Saws on Skates

Hey friends! I’ve never designed a “knock off” piece of furniture, but after I thumbed through the Holiday issue of the Plow & Hearth catalog I decided it was time to add to my own catalog of DIY furniture plans! Here’s my first knockoff… a DIY Knock Off Plow & Hearth Stool.

Stool Catalog pic sos

Among all of the natural fir wreaths and fireplace accessories, I spotted the “Elmwood Stool”. It’s a great looking stool and I loved the aged wood tones, so I read more about it… extra seating, one-of-a-kind, made from 100 year old Elm wood doors, etc. Okay, but how much? $119!!! Yikes! For a stool! I could make one of these and for a lot less.

I went right to Sketchup and started designing a copy cat, knock off stool. Well actually I started designing right after I watched a few videos about how to design splayed legs, then I was off and running. I got the catalog on a Monday, had a rough plan by Tuesday and a nearly completed stool by Sunday afternoon.

Plow & Hearth Elmwood Stool: $119.00

pnh elmwood stool

Saws on Skates knock off version: about $9.00!

Stool Fireplace 1 sos

Here’s what I came up with. What do you think? It sure looks like the original to me. The only tricky part are the legs. They require compound miters, and to be honest, I rarely make compound miter cuts. Just follow the instructions and I think I’ll easily be able to walk you through it. These would make great gifts. You could actually make about a dozen of them for the price of one of the originals!

Saws on Skates version compared to the Plow & Hearth catalog pic

Stool Comparison 1 sos


DIY Knock Off Plow & Hearth Stool Plan


Stool Sketch ISO

Printed Plan
Click here to download a PDF of the Knock Off Plow & Hearth Stool Plan

Supplies
(1) 2x2x8
(1) 2X4X8
(1) 1X4X6
1-1/4″ pocket screws
2-1/2″ pocket screws
Scrap pieces of 1/4″ plywood or MDF
Rust-Oleum Ultimate Wood Stain “Kona”

Tools
Stanley FatMax Tape Measure
Compound Miter Saw
Kreg Jig
DEWALT Drill
Jig Saw or chisel
Random Orbit Sander
1″ Forstner Bit

Step 1. Cut Legs. Set miter saw table to 5 degrees. Set miter saw bevel to 5 degrees. Cut first angle on 2×2. Leave piece on the saw. Measure from the miter you just cut, along the top of the piece and make a mark at 16-1/8″. Slide the piece, so the mark corresponds with the saw blade. Place a stop at the end of the piece, so you can cut the other three legs to the same length. Make your cut and repeat for the other three legs.

Stool Sketch Legs

Set miter saw table to 5 degrees.

Stool Miter Table Angle

Set miter saw bevel to 5 degrees.

Stool Bevel Angle

Cut first angle on 2×2. Leave piece on the saw.

Stool Prepping Second Compound Cut

Measure from the miter you just cut, along the top of the piece…

Stool Prepping Second Compound Cut 1

and make a mark at 16-1/8″.

Stool Prepping Second Compound Cut 2

Slide the piece, so the mark corresponds with the saw blade.

Stool Second Compound Cut

Place a stop at the end of the piece, so you can cut the other three legs to the same length.

Stool Second Compound Cut 1

Make your cut and repeat for the other three legs.

Stool Second Compound Cut 2

Step 2. Cut the Long Sides. Cut 2 pieces of 1×4 to 11″, then cut a 5 degree angle on each end. Drill pocket holes in each end and two pocket holes in the top (shorter side). These pocket holes will be used to attach the top in Step 10.

Stool Sketch Long Side

Step 3. Cut the Short Sides. Cut 2 pieces of 1×4 to 6-9/16″, then cut a 5 degree angle on each end. Drill pocket holes in each end and one pocket hole in the top (shorter side). These pocket holes will be used to attach the top in Step 10.

Stool Sketch Short Side

Note: It’s a good idea to use a Random Orbit Sander to sand all of the parts you have cut so far, before you start assembling.

Stool Parts

Step 4. Orient the Legs. Set up the legs as they should look when attached to the stool. In other words, the legs should splay out at the bottom and the top of the legs should be parallel to the workbench. Take the legs that are farthest away from you and lay them on the table, so the top of the legs face away from you. Lay the legs closest to you, so the top of the legs are facing you. Now the bottoms of the legs should be facing each other.

Stool Legs 1

Take the legs that are farthest away from you and lay them on the table, so the top of the legs face away from you.

Stool Legs 2

Lay the legs closest to you, so the top of the legs are facing you. Now the bottoms of the legs should be facing each other.

Stool Legs 3

Step 5. Attach Short Sides. With the top of the legs still facing you, put two pieces of scrap 1/4″ material on the workbench in between the legs. This scrap will set the side in 1/4″.

Stool Side Assembly 1

Apply glue to each end of a Short Side, place between legs (so the short edge is facing towards you) on top of the scrap, clamp to the legs and attach using 1-1/4″ pocket screws. Repeat with the other set of legs and Short Side.

Stool Side Assembly 3

Stool Side Assembly 2

Stool Side Assembly 4

Step 6. Attach Long Sides. With the top of the legs facing you, put two pieces of scrap 1/4″ material on the workbench in between the legs. Apply glue to each end of a Long Side, place between legs (so the short edge is facing towards you) on top of the scrap, clamp to the legs and attach using 1-1/4″ pocket screws. Repeat for the other Long Side.

Stool Attach Long Side 1

Stool Attach Long Side 2

Step 7. Cut the Top pieces. Cut 3 pieces of 2×4 to 15″. On 2 pieces, mark 1/2″ on 2 corners and cut a 45 degree angle.

Stool Sketch TopTop 45 degree angle

Step 8. Make the handle. On the third top piece (the one without the angles), layout the handle.

Stool Sketch Handle

Using 1″ Forstner Bit, drill each end of the handle.

Stool Handle 1

Using a jig saw remove the area between the two holes. I opted to use a chisel to remove this material.

Stool Handle 2

Stool Handle 3

Note: It’s a good idea to use a random orbit sander to sand all of the parts now, before you start assembling. I would also recommend rounding over the cut edges to match the edge contour of the 2×4.

Step 9. Assemble the top. The top pieces are 1-1/2″ thick, so be sure to adjust your Kreg Jig for this extra thickness. I set my jig to 1-3/8″ because I didn’t want to take the chance of the pocket hole being drilled through the side of the top.

Set the top pieces on your workbench and temporarily center the legs on the top pieces – do not attach. Mark the locations for pocket holes to be drilled in the top pieces making sure to avoid areas where you drilled pocket holes in the side pieces – these pocket holes were drilled in Step 2 and Step 3 and will attach the sides to the top. Also, avoid drilling pocket holes through the handle.

Stool Top 1

Once you have marked the locations, drill pocket holes, apply glue and clamp.

Stool Top 2

Attach using 2-1/2″ pocket screws.

Stool Top 3

Step 10. Attach top to legs. Place the top on your workbench, so you are looking at the bottom. Center legs on the top and clamp.

Stool Attach Legs to Top

Attach using 1-1/4″ pocket screws.

Stool Attach Legs to Top 2

Finish
To finish the stool I first applied a coat of Sherwin Williams “Oak Mantle” stain to give it golden glow. Then I applied a coat of Rust-Oleum Ultimate Wood Stain “Kona” to darken it up. I finished it with three coats of my favorite DIY finish.


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3 thoughts on “DIY Knock Off Plow & Hearth Stool

  1. len says:

    Nice. Thanks for sharing.

  2. […] Scott from Saws on Skates was flipping through the Plow & Hearth catalog when a wood stool with aged wood tones caught his eye. It was pretty hard to miss the $119 price tag too. Scott had never designed a piece of knock off furniture before, but this little stool was inspiring enough to give it a go. Scott says, “I got the catalog on a Monday, had a rough plan by Tuesday and a nearly completed stool by Sunday afternoon.” Scott has made the woodworking plans available so you can build this stool for roughly $9. Talk about a bargain for a beautiful wooden stool! […]

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