DIY Outdoor Plant Stand for Multiple Plants

Get your Kreg Jig and make this creative DIY outdoor plant stand! These patio cabinet plans show how to build a tiered wooden display for multiple plants.

Get your Kreg Jig and make this creative DIY Outdoor Plant Stand! These patio cabinet plans show how to build a tiered wooden display for multiple plants!

This DIY outdoor plant stand is easy to build with pocket holes and pocket screws. The 3 tier patio cabinet is a decorative way to display flowers, vegetables, and herbs. It’s enclosed with chicken wire which will keep critters from eating your plants!

You may also enjoy this DIY Outdoor Coffee Table with 4 Hidden Side Tables, DIY Outdoor Side Table, and this DIY Tiered Raised Garden Bed.

Originally published August 2, 2016 updated April 9, 2019

This tutorial contains affiliate links to supplies and tools. Purchases made using these links help support the Saws on Skates website and allows me to share more projects and tips with you. There is no cost to you for using these links. Visit my site policies for more information.

My friend Linda wanted to deck out her deck with flowers for the summer, but she had a problem. A big problem.

Her problem was a big woodchuck living under her deck and ole “Chuck” wasn’t bashful about nibbling her flowers down to nubs. Could I come up with a creative way to display her flowers and protect them from plant-eating animals?

The Inspiration for the DIY Outdoor Plant Stand

What I came up with was a tall outdoor plant stand inspired by an antique pie safe. Old time pie safes had tin punched panels that allowed pies to cool without letting bugs in.

Instead of tin punched panels, I would attach chicken wire panels to the wooden garden cabinet.

The chicken wire would serve a dual purpose. It would allow you to see inside and it would keep critters from munching on the plants. Plus, the chicken wire would give the garden cabinet a farmhouse look.

The DIY Outdoor Plant Stand Displays Multiple Plants

This DIY outdoor plant stand featured 3 tiers or shelves. Linda could display one large pot on each shelf or groupings of smaller pots on each shelf. The vertical design of the garden cabinet would also add height to her deck.

The door of this DIY outdoor plant stand is open showing the 3 tiers for displaying flowers

Linda planned to grow flowers in her cabinet but it would be great for other types of plants too. It would be perfect by a kitchen door filled with herbs like basil, chives, and thyme. And it would make a good place for a small container vegetable garden filled with salad greens, onions and more.

Where to Use a DIY Outdoor Plant Stand

Linda set up her outdoor plant stand on her deck, but it would also look great on a patio, porch or balcony.

This wooden DIY outdoor plant stand is enclosed with chicken wire to keep plant-eating animals out of the garden cabinet

Use the DIY Plant Stand Outdoors or Indoors

I think this garden cabinet would also look great indoors. Imagine it in a kitchen or in a dining room filled with houseplants like ivy. And wouldn’t it look awesome with a chippy paint finish? I love that this project has so many possibilities!

Before we get into how to make a DIY outdoor plant stand, be sure to click the subscribe button at the bottom of this page to sign up for my FREE weekly newsletter loaded with helpful pocket hole tricks, space-saving workshop ideas, clever DIY tips and more!

DIY Outdoor Plant Stand Plans

Printed Plan
Click here to get the FREE plan!

Supplies
(1) 1x2x8
(12) 1x3x8
1-1/4″ Pocket Screws Blue-Kote
1-1/4″ Exterior Screws
2″ Exterior Screws
(2) Cabinet Hinges
Knob
Magnetic Catch
Chicken Wire
Exterior Wood Glue
Ready Patch
Exterior Paint or Stain

Tools
Tape Measure
Miter Saw
Circular Saw
Kreg Jig
Kreg Multi-Mark
Drill
Countersink Drill Bit
Random Orbit Sander
Staple Gun
Metal Snips
Router (optional)
Round over bit (optional)

Step 1. Cut the Legs

Cut 8 pieces of 1×3 to 59-1/4″. Make the angled foot by measuring up 7″ and in 1-1/2″ then connect the marks. I placed a crosscut jig on the line and cut the angle with a circular saw. Repeat for the remaining legs.

Related: How to Make a DIY Circular Saw Crosscut Jig

Sketch showing the foot detail of the outdoor plant stand

Step 2. Cut the Side Rails

Cut 8 pieces of 1×3 to 9-3/4″ and drill pocket holes in each end.

Related: How to Use Pocket Hole Jig

Sketch showing the rail dimensions for the outdoor plant stand

Step 3. Assemble the Sides

Place two legs on your workbench (be sure the angles face inward) then apply glue to the rails and position on the legs. I cut 6 pieces of scrap wood to 13-3/4″ to help properly position the rails. Attach using 1-1/4″ pocket screws. Repeat for the second side.

Sketch showing the side rail locations for the outdoor plant stand

Step 4. Assemble the Back

Cut 4 pieces of 1×3 to 12-1/2″ and drill pocket holes in each end. Place two legs on your workbench (be sure the angles face inward) then apply glue to the rails and position on the legs. I used 6 pieces of scrap wood cut to 13-3/4″ to help properly position the rails. Attach using 1-1/4″ pocket screws.

Sketch showing the back rail locations for the outdoor plant stand

Step 5. Assemble the Front

Cut 2 pieces of 1×3 to 14″ and drill pocket holes in each end. Place two legs on your workbench (be sure the angles face inward) then apply glue to the rails and position on the legs. The top rail is flush with the top and the bottom rail sets up 8” from the bottom. Attach using 1-1/4″ pocket screws.

Sketch showing how to assemble the front of the outdoor plant stand

Step 6. Drill Pocket Holes in the Side Assemblies

The sides are attached to the front assembly with pocket screws. Use the diagram to mark the locations and then drill the pocket holes.

TIP: Be sure to make a right and left side.

Sketch showing the pocket hole locations for the side assemblies for the outdoor plant stand

Step 7. Drill Pocket Holes in the Back Assembly

The back assembly is attached to the side assemblies with pocket screws. Use the diagram to mark the locations and then drill the pocket holes.

Sketch showing the pocket hole locations for the back assemblies for the outdoor plant stand

Step 8. Sand the Assemblies

It’s easier to sand all of the parts prior to assembly. I set up my folding workbench and sanded all of the parts with my random orbit sander.

Related: 11 Secrets for Sanding Wood Projects Like a Pro

Step 9. Assemble the Carcass

Apply glue to a side and clamp to the front. Attach using 1-1/4″ pocket screws. Repeat for the other side.

Apply glue to the back, clamp to the sides and attach using 1-1/4″ pocket screws.

Attaching the front and back assemblies to the side assemblies for the outdoor plant stand

Step 10. Assemble the Door

Cut 2 pieces of 1×3 to 48-1/4″. Cut 2 pieces of 1×3 to 11″ and drill pocket holes in each end. Apply glue to the rails, clamp to the stiles and attach using 1-1/4″ pocket screws.

This is optional, but I used a 1/4″ round over bit in my router to give the front of the door a little extra detail.

Related: How to Use a Router Table for Beginners

Assembling the door for the outdoor plant stand

Step 11. Assemble the Top

Cut 2 pieces of 1×3 to 20-1/2″. Cut 2 pieces of 1×3 to 11-1/2″ and drill pocket holes in each end. Apply glue to the sides and clamp to the front and back pieces. Attach using 1-1/4″ pocket screws.

Assembling the top for the outdoor plant stand

Step 12. Install the Cleats

Cut 6 pieces of 1×2 to 14″. The cleats set up a 1/2″ from the bottom of the side rails. I used a piece of scrap 1/2″ MDF to help with aligning the cleats. I clamped the MDF so it was flush with the bottom of the side rail.

I placed the cleat on top of the MDF and clamped it to the side rail. Then I drilled several countersink holes in the edge of the cleat. Attach using 2″ exterior screws. Repeat for the remaining cleats.

Installing the cleats to support the shelves for the outdoor plant stand

Step 13. Cut the Slats

Cut 15 pieces of 1×3 to 17-1/2″.

Step 14. Paint or Stain the Carcass and Slats

I filled all of the pocket holes with Ready Patch, so water wouldn’t collect in the holes and potentially rot the wood. It’s easier to paint or stain all of the parts prior to final assembly. I used Behr solid exterior stain in “Colonial Yellow” for the cabinet.

The slats were stained with two shades of Behr semi-transparent exterior stain. The first coat was “Russet” and the second coat was “Padre Brown”.

Step 15. Attach the Chicken Wire to the Back

I used metal snips to cut the chicken wire to fit each of the three openings in the back. I attached the chicken wire with staples and a staple gun.

Step 16. Attach the Slats and Chicken Wire to the Sides

The slats are spaced a 1/4″ apart. I used some scrap pieces of 1/4″ MDF to help with aligning the slats. Starting at the front of the cabinet, place a piece of MDF on each cleat then place a slat and attach using 1-1/4″ finish nails.

Related: Brad Nailer vs Finish Nailer: Are They The Same?

Remove the MDF and set behind the slat that was just installed. Place another slat and attach using 1-1/4″.

Repeat for the remaining slats for that shelf. Do not install the slats for the other shelves yet.

It’s easier to install the chicken to the sides as you complete the installation of one shelf. I used metal snips to cut the chicken wire to fit the two side openings and attached with staples. Then repeat Step 16 for the remaining shelves and side openings.

Installing the shelf slats for the outdoor plant stand

Step 17. Attach the Chicken Wire to the Top

Place the top on the cabinet. The top is flush with the back, overhangs the side by 3/4″ and overhangs the front by 1″. From the inside, use a pencil to mark the inside dimension of the cabinet on the top.

Use metal snips to cut a piece of chicken wire to fit within the pencil lines and attach using staples.

Step 18. Attach the Top

Place the top on the cabinet. The top is flush with the back, overhangs the side by 3/4″ and overhangs the front by 1″. Drill several countersink holes and attach using 1-1/4″ exterior screws. Fill the holes with Ready Patch and touch up with your cabinet color.

Related: How to Use a Countersink Bit

Attaching the top to the outdoor plant stand

Step 19. Attach the Chicken Wire to the Door

The chicken wire needs to be set on the door, so it doesn’t hit the frame of the cabinet. Set your Kreg Multi-Mark to 1-1/2″ and make a pencil line all the way around the door. Use metal snips to cut a piece of chicken wire to fit within the pencil lines and attach using staples.

Step 20. Attach the Door

Attach the cabinet hinges to the back of the door. The door sets up from the bottom rail 1-1/2″ and in from each side 1-1/2″. I used a scrap piece of 1×2 to help with the aligning the bottom of the door. Clamp the 1×2 so it’s flush with the bottom of the cabinet bottom rail.

First, attach the hinges to the door. Use the Kreg multi-mark set to 1-1/2″ to center the door from side to side on the cabinet, then attach the hinges to the cabinet.

Step 21. Attach the Knob

You can install the knob anywhere you like, but I centered mine top to bottom on the door.

Step 22. Attach the Magnetic Catch

First, install the magnet on the cabinet, then install the corresponding piece on the door.

Final Thoughts

This DIY Outdoor Plant Stand is easy to build with pocket holes and pocket screws. The 3 tier design is a decorative way to display flowers, veggies, and herbs. It’s enclosed with chicken wire which will keep critters from eating your plants!

Thank you for stopping by. If you found this information helpful, would you please pin it to Pinterest? Other DIYers would appreciate it and I would too! Thank you – Scott


Pin This For Later

9 Comments

  1. WOW! That came out amazing, Scott.

    Nice work — I bet Linda forgave your behind-the-scenes paint machinations when she saw that beautiful cabinet! 🙂

    1. Thank you Bob! She has forgiven me and she agrees the colors of the chairs and cabinet look great together!

    1. Thank you Cher-Ann! So far the cabinet seems to be working… the plants are safe and intact!

  2. Nice job Scott, would you be interested in selling one and how much. I can use something like that to put my water bottle on top of.

    1. Thank you Claude! I’m flattered you would like to buy one, but I’m not building to sell at this point. I’ll definitely let you know if anything changes in the future. Thank you again!

    1. Estoy muy contento de que fueron capaces de seguir el tutorial y construir su propio! Me gustaría ver una foto de su proyecto! He utilizado el traductor de google, así que espero que esto tenga sentido.

COMMENTS

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.